Meet the speakers at COP26, from Beyoncé’s writer to an activist praised by Harry and Meghan

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A poet, an activist hailed by Meghan Markle and Prince Harry and a woman at the forefront of stopping Amazon deforestation were among the millennium speakers joining world leaders including Boris Johnson at the ceremony opening of COP26 today.

Environmental activists from Kenya, Samoa and Brazil addressed world leaders including Boris Johnson and US President Joe Biden today in Glasgow, speaking about indigenous rights and issues facing nations around the world, including droughts in Kenya and indigenous rights in South America.

Among the speakers was a British model turned poet Yrsa Daley-Ward, who told the delegates “nothing will be saved without you. It is important to start with the fact. This is your invitation to lead with the light ‘.

The poet – who once wrote for Beyoncé – was followed by a smallpiper gave world leaders a very Scottish welcome to the COP26 climate change summit as they gathered amid warnings about taking urgent action to limit global warming.

Native Gaelic speaker Brìghde Chaimbeul, from Sleat on the Isle of Skye, entertained politicians and royals at the Scottish Event Campus with her own arrangement of the traditional melodies An Léimras and Harris Dance.

Here, FEMAIL looks at the other activists who speak out today …

Model-turned-poet Yrsa Daley-War d, 36, joined Boris Johnson and other world leaders on stage at the opening ceremony of COP26 today where she presented a poem

MODEL BECOME A POET WHO WRITE FOR BEYONCE

Model turned poet Yrsa Daley-Ward, 36, joined Boris Johnson and other world leaders on stage at the opening ceremony of COP26 today, where she presented a poem.

He opened up with her saying, “Nothing will be saved without you. It is important to start with the fact. This is your invitation to lead with the light. ‘.

The ‘Instagram poet’ who previously worked as a Topshop model rose to fame in 2014 after her first poetry collection Bone received critical acclaim.

The 'Instagram poet' who previously worked as a Topshop model rose to fame in 2014 after her debut poetry collection Bone received critical acclaim

The ‘Instagram poet’ who previously worked as a Topshop model rose to fame in 2014 after her debut poetry collection Bone received critical acclaim

In 2018 sex work to help pay the bills.

Critics praised Yrsa, who also landed jobs as a dancer and actress on shows including Shameless for refusing to run away from the dark episodes in her life, for being paid to act as a domineering over a man. aged, to suffer racism as a young girl.

Speaking about the nature of her escort job, she previously told the Guardian: ‘You have a boyfriend for two months who is a millionaire.

“In this situation you are safe, eating caviar, drinking champagne. There are other situations which are considerably less certain and less consensual.

“It is a reality for so many women in the entertainment industry and we are told not to talk about it.”

Critics praised Yrsa, who also landed jobs as a dancer and actress on shows like Shameless for refusing to run away from the dark episodes in her life, to be paid to act as a domineering over a man. aged, to suffer racism as a young girl.

Critics praised Yrsa, who also landed dancer and acting jobs on shows like Shameless for refusing to run away from the dark episodes in her life, for being paid to act as a domineering over a man. aged, to suffer racism as a young girl.

Her fans include Beyoncé. Yrsa – who has Jamaican and Nigerian ancestors – is credited on the seminal visual album Black is King as well as The Lion King: The Gift – the soundtrack to the 2019 remake of The Lion King.

She grew up between Chorley, Lancashire – with her strict Seventh-day Adventist grandparents – and in London with her mother Marcia.

When Yrsa was growing up, Marcia told her that the man she grew up believing to be her father was not her biological father. She had been inspired by an episode of Coronation Street with a similar storyline.

Her mother died in 2007, causing her to sink into depression. It was then that she packed her bags and moved to South Africa for three years where she discovered her love of poetry.

INDIGENOUS ACTIVIST SUITS BRAZILIAN GOVERNMENT

Txai Surui, 24 years old, from Brazil joined the world leaders today in Glasgow where she warned: “Today the climate is warming, animals are disappearing, rivers are dying and our plants are not blooming like they used to. Earth speaks. She tells us that we have no more time. ‘.

The indigenous activist, who lives in Rondonia in the Amazon, is the daughter of Neidinha Surui, one of the country’s leading activists for the Paiter suri people.

After studying law, she worked with Kanindé – Associação de Defesa Etnoambiental (Ethno-environmental Defense Association) to protect the rights and territory of indigenous communities.

Txai Suruí, 24, from Brazil, joined world leaders today in Glasgow where she warned: “Today the climate is warming, animals are disappearing, rivers are dying and our plants are not blooming like they used to be.  Earth speaks.  She tells us that we have no more time.

Txai Suruí, 24, from Brazil, joined world leaders today in Glasgow where she warned: “Today the climate is warming, animals are disappearing, rivers are dying and our plants are not blooming like they used to be. Earth speaks. She tells us that we have no more time.

Txai Surui speaking at COP26.  Because of his work - and that of his mother - his family has been threatened and they are under police protection.

Txai Surui speaking at COP26. Because of his work – and that of his mother – his family has been threatened and they are under police protection.

She then founded the youth movement and is one of six activists to sue the Brazilian government for changing its 2005 carbon benchmark in order to meet the carbon emissions reduction targets set by the Paris Agreement on weather.

Because of her – and her mother’s job – her family has been threatened and she is under police protection.

Speaking to The Independent last year, she said she feared the coronavirus was devastating indigenous communities and that she wanted people to listen more to indigenous communities.

“To preserve the Amazon is to preserve human existence itself,” she said.

“Preserving the rights of indigenous peoples means preserving animals, [the] medicinal plants. My message to everyone is to listen to what indigenous communities have to say, support their cause and protect their homes. Everything is linked, so protecting the forest and indigenous communities is protecting the future of the world. ‘

A KENYAN ACTIVIST WHO HAS BEEN RENTED BY MEGHAN AND HARRY

Elizabeth Wathuti, 26, from Kenya, also spoke at COP26 today, telling world leaders to “open their hearts” to those already feeling the effects of climate change.

She spoke of a drought in her home country, which means many are short of food.

“As I sit comfortably here in this conference center in Glasgow, over two million of my fellow Kenyans face climate-related famine,” she said.

“In the past year, our two rainy seasons have failed, and scientists say it may be another 12 months before the waters return.”

Elizabeth Wathuti, 26, of Kenya also spoke at COP26 today, telling world leaders to

Elizabeth Wathuti, 26, from Kenya also spoke at COP26 today, telling world leaders to “open your heart” to those already feeling the effects of climate change

Wathuti, who today urged leaders to take action to tackle climate change, has previously appeared in Vogue, having been verified by fellow activist Vanessa Nakate.

Wathuti, who today urged leaders to take action to tackle climate change, has previously appeared in Vogue, having been verified by fellow activist Vanessa Nakate.

Wathuti, who today urged leaders to take action to tackle climate change, has previously appeared in Vogue, having been verified by fellow activist Vanessa Nakate.

In 2019, she was featured on the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s Instagram page for her work in environmental conservation, with the royal couple writing that she is: “has made incredible progress since launching community initiative “.

They also praised her for “focusing on deforestation, climate change and pollution” as well as for training more than 10,000 schoolchildren to be environmentally conscious through her initiative.

Last year, she wrote to Alok Sharma, president of COP26, calling on leaders to act urgently against the killing and harassment of conservationists.

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