Shakespeare’s Globe praises poem calling gender-aware women ‘sluts’ after gambling controversy

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Shakespeare’s Globe praised a poem calling female gender critics “b****es” after the theater was criticized for its portrayal of Joan of Arc as non-binary.

Yesterday, the world-renowned venue shared several ‘artistic audience responses’ to the new production of I, Joan on its Twitter page.

The post, which has since been deleted, read: “We loved seeing the pure joy shared for me, Joan, but most of all, we loved seeing how it inspired you.

‘Be bold. Be creative. And share your truth. We are all beautiful. We are all powerful. #WeAreJoan’

Alongside the tweet, The Globe’s social media account also shared a poem written by Alex and fan art by Liam and Rejka.

Using a play on the title of C. S. Lewis’ fantasy novel The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the first line of the poem calls female gender critics “b****es”.

Shakespeare’s Globe has praised a poem calling female gender critics ‘b****es’ after the theater came under fire for its portrayal of Joan of Arc as non-binary

Yesterday, the world famous venue shared several 'artistic audience responses' to the new production of I, Joan on its Twitter page

Yesterday, the world famous venue shared several ‘artistic audience responses’ to the new production of I, Joan on its Twitter page

Alongside the tweet, The Globe's social media account also shared a poem written by Alex and fan art by Liam and Rejka.

Alongside the tweet, The Globe’s social media account also shared a poem written by Alex and fan art by Liam and Rejka.

Using a play on the title of CS Lewis' fantasy novel The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the first line of the poem calls out to women who are gender critics

Using a play on the title of CS Lewis’s fantasy novel The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the first line of the poem calls female gender critics “b****es”

The literary composition, titled “Terfs stop being a transphobic challenge”, goes on to say that “men take away their choices” and “I don’t know how they live”.

The post quickly drew criticism, with one user saying: ‘@The_Globe why did it take you all day to delete your tweet of a disgusting poem celebrating calling women ‘b****es’? Because it’s too little too late to be honest.

A Globe spokesperson said: ‘In sharing a selection of the public’s artistic responses to I, Joan on social media, we have shared something in a moment of misjudgment. The tweet was promptly deleted and we apologize for any offense caused.

“I, Joan, as a new play, conveys messages of joy, hope, love and inclusion for all. The play runs until October 22 and we hope audiences can come and enjoy and appreciate all that it offers.

It comes after Harry Potter author JK Rowling ridiculed the theater’s new portrayal of Joan of Arc as non-binary and using ‘they/them’ pronouns.

Ms Rowling is a long-time women’s rights campaigner and has spoken out on concerns about transgender people having access to women-only spaces.

It comes after Harry Potter author JK Rowling ridiculed the theater's new depiction of Joan of Arc as non-binary and using the pronouns

It comes after Harry Potter author JK Rowling ridiculed the theater’s new portrayal of Joan of Arc as non-binary and using “they/them” pronouns.

Ms Rowling liked a tweet ridiculing the new non-binary production of Joan of Arc at The Globe

Ms Rowling liked a tweet ridiculing the new non-binary production of Joan of Arc at The Globe

Joan of Arc is one of the most famous and inspiring women in French history and a saint

Joan of Arc is one of the most famous and inspiring women in French history and a saint

Following a tweet criticizing the production, Ms Rowling remarked: ‘Coming soon: Napoleon was a woman because he was defeated at Waterloo.’

Joan was embraced as a feminist icon and for the suffragette movement she was even featured on their posters.

A full version of the poem shared on The Globe’s Twitter account read:

terfs stop being transphobic challenge

the lion, the witch, the audacity of this bitch

question my authority over bodily autonomy.

mutilation, in their own words, a sacrilegious scourge,

this societal condition, the transgender affliction

tearing apart the youth, turning boys into girls.

we cut off the breasts of toddlers,

one would think to hear them speak,

with so much trash locked inside

it is a miracle that they survive.

now they’re questioning my right to proudly identify myself,

I want to pacify, pathologize every aspect of my life,

want to take away my choices while men take away theirs,

wanna put me in the ground, wanna shut me up again.

I just think they’re scared because I’m angrier than them,

because I am angry with them and with men,

but my anger does not blind, it only clarifies,

and it scares them, I can see it in their eyes,

even as they cover themselves in transphobic lies.

my beauty amazes them, their anger confounds me,

I don’t know how they alive, it makes them so blind

that they cannot see the path on which they are led

is another fucking road paved by fucking men.

we cannot resist them when they turn your anger against us,

So please, for once, show us some fucking love,

and remember we are looking for the same thing you are looking for,

a world made for all, the bold and the gentle,

our liberation is intertwined, it’s been like this all along,

watch the patriarchy crumble as you stand right next to it

your transgender brothers and sisters,

please join us in the fight.

Alex Curry

Ongoing gender identity debates mean the Globe’s decision – which received £3m of taxpayers’ money in 2020 to help it through the pandemic – is sure to spark controversy .

It is unclear whether the piece was commissioned or funded by the Globe itself. Isobel Thom plays the title role.

The play is written by Charlie Josephine who is non-binary and whose website says uses the pronouns they/he.

In an interview on I, Joan, the writer said of the production, “It’s going to be this big fest of sweat, fag, revolution, rebellion, joy alike.”

“It’s a big story, on a big stage, Joan of Arc was this incredible historical figure.

“Joan was this working class, young person, transgressing gender at a time when it was really dangerous and felt immediately applicable to me.

“I was designated female at birth. I’m not binary, I come from a working class background. I often felt like I had something to say and didn’t get permission to say it.

“So having the opportunity to write a play about a character is also trying to do it, I was like, uh, this is really too good to be true.

“So it’s like a huge, huge thing that I want to do well and really care about.”

Director Ilinca Radulian added, “We’re just trying to do something that puts people in Joan’s place, in Joan’s body, like, with this mission, with these questions, and with this sense of possibility.

“We want to take the audience on a journey of discovery with Joan.”

Charlie continued: “It’s like an expansion of a historical figure, yes and I hope it opens up new possibilities for empathy and new possibilities for understanding for everyone.

Michelle Terry, artistic director of The Globe, said the production asked the audience to consider something different.

She said, “Shakespeare didn’t write historically accurate plays. He took figures from the past to ask questions about today’s world. Our writers today make no difference whether they are Ann Boleyn, Nell Gwynn, Emilia Bassano, Edward II or Joan of Arc.

“The Globe is a place of imagination. A place where, for a short time, one can at least consider the possibility of an elsewhere in the world. We’ve had entire storms on stage, boat sinkings, look-alike twins being believable, and even a fairy queen falling in love with a donkey.

‘Shakespeare’s Globe proudly presents a new play, I, Joan with Joan as the legendary leader, who in this production, uses the pronouns ‘they/them’. The production is still being created and opens August 25 in the outdoor Globe Theater. We’re not the first to portray Joan in this way, and we won’t be the last. To specifically address the use of pronouns, the use of “they” to refer to a singular person has been traced by the Oxford English Dictionary as far back as 1375, years before Joan was even born. But theaters do not deal with “historical reality”. Theaters produce plays, and in plays anything can be possible.

“Joan’s army will be made up of hundreds of ‘Groundlings’ standing in the courtyard, all coming to watch a play for £5 – the most accessible ticket price in London theatre.” We hope that this £5 ticket will invite as many people as possible to come and make up their own minds, and even if we disagree with each other, be kind, curious and respectful.

“It was no coincidence that Shakespeare moved his playhouse beyond the jurisdiction of the City of London walls. He wanted to play. Play with identity, with power, with the idea of ​​fun and with all aspects of an argument.Shakespeare had the ability to imagine the lives of 1,223 characters, he could understand perspectives and differences and articulate them so well that we still appreciate his work over 400 years later.

“For centuries, Joan has been a cultural icon portrayed in countless plays, books, films, and more. History has provided countless wonderful examples of Joan portrayed as a woman. This production simply offers the possibility of another point of view. This is the role of theatre: simply asking the question “imagine if? “.


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